5 Famous Movie Songs (That Were Last-Minute Replacements)

 
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    April 27, 2012 at 6:00 am

    Say Anything, Blaze of Glory, I will always love you

    When an awesome famous movie song matches up with the perfect film scene, the results can be seen as popular art at its finest. Which is why it can be shocking to realize that a lot of these amazing song-film synergies are due to dumb luck. With that in mind, we found 5 famous movie songs that weren’t originally intended to be in the film:

    1. “In Your Eyes”

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    It’s a known fact that no one on the planet can remember anything about the film, Say Anything, except, “John Cusack gets the girl by using Peter Gabriel to violate several noise ordinances.”

    The original song that director Cameron Crowe wanted John Cusack’s character to blast was Billy Idol’s “To Be a Lover”. Which is better, because we can never tell if Billy Idol is being ironic in any of his songs.

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    2. “I Will Always Love You”

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    This single was such a blockbuster that Dolly Parton, its original writer, made $100 freaking million just from royalties. Made unique by the one-of-a-kind Whitney Houston, “I Will Always Love You” led The Bodyguard to become the best-selling soundtrack in music history. Billboard ranked it as the 68th greatest song of all time (don’t get too excited about this, it was one spot ahead of Coolio’s “Gangsta’s Paradise.”

    But it almost wasn’t in the film at all.

    Whitney Houston was all geared up to record “What Becomes of the Broken Hearted,” by Jimmy Ruffin. However, another film was already using that piece, the film Fried Green Tomatoes. Whitney backed down and graciously decided to record the most blockbuster cover in music history. Which is a good thing, because Houston could’ve whupped Tomatoes star Jessica Tandy, if it came down to it.

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    3. “Eye of the Tiger”

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    A movie strength-building montage wouldn’t be complete without this Survivor hit song blasting. Chosen as the main song for Rocky III (you know, the one where he fights Mr. T), Eye of the Tiger feel like a perfect fit. But it wasn’t the original choice.

    Rocky was originally supposed to jog and climb to Queen’s “Another One Bites the Dust.” Which, frankly, has as much to do with perpetual underdog Rocky Balboa as the Bruce Springsteen song “Streets of Philadelphia.”

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    4. “Blaze of Glory”

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    The Young Guns film series from the early 1990s was responsible for jump-starting a nation of preteen girls into puberty. Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland, Lou Diamond Phillips, and Christian Slater were all pretty hot cowboys, made even more intense by the rock stylings of Bon Jovi.

    Jon Bon Jovi was always intended to be the songwriter for the album. Having embarked on a solo career, Emilio Estevez asked to use Bon Jovi’s “Wanted Dead or Alive.” Instead, Bon Jovi wrote the chart-topping “Blaze of Glory,” and a whole bunch of other songs for the film. This kept millions of suburban parents from going insane, as Bon Jovi’s record kept New Kids on the Block out of the stereo.

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    5. “Notorious”

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    Half of Donnie Darko’s unique success comes from its “WTF, I have to read a book to understand it” plot. The other half comes from juxtaposing suburban life with death, agony, and sex. As such, Sparkle Motion’s sensationalized, almost sexual pre-teen dance routine fits perfectly with Duran Duran’s “Notorious.”

    However, first time director Richard Kelly had originally had a different song intended, to the point of filming the entire scene. Watching Sparkle Motion’s “Notorious” routine, it’s important to note that the choreography was done to “West End Girls” by the Pet Shop Boys. However, Kelly had not considered the cost of licensing the song, and when the Pet Shop Boys told him, Kelly did a spit take and slapped them both upside the head [source needed].

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    Sometimes amazing song-film synchronicity is intended, like with Pink Floyd’s “Echoes” and the end of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Sometimes it’s accidental, like with Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, and The Wizard of Oz. Either way it’s important to stop and appreciate the sublime experience that happens when a masterfully produced movie scene fits perfectly with a fully engineered song. It’ll save you a lot of money on weed.

     
     
     
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